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MICHAEL JACKSON'S SECRET MUSIC VIDEO

by Hank Willow, staff reporter [August 30, 2002]

 

 

 

[HollywoodInvestigator.com]  A never-released Jacko music video was doomed to oblivion after Michael Jackson was alleged to have molested a boy in 1993, because the video's storyline took on a new -- and embarrassing -- light after the allegations!

The Hollywood Investigator received that shocking claim from a working actress in Santa Monica, California.

According to the actress, she had worked as an extra on a Jacko video shortly before publication of the now infamous child molestation charges. She did not know what song the video was intended for, nor even if the song was from Jacko's 1991 Dangerous CD, or upcoming 1995 HIStory.

The actress described the video as featuring a Frankenstein storyline in which a mob of angry villagers corner Jacko -- and demand that he stay away from their children. Jacko, cast in the role of the monster, protests that he loves children and would never harm them.

The actress stated that Jacko kept urging the extras to insult him so as to "put him in the mood" for his part. Although the extras tried to comply -- they instinctively held back.

"It felt so strange," the actress said. "We kept shouting 'you're weird, you're a freak, you're strange!' ... But how far could we go? I mean, he was! I kept wondering, can't he see? Didn't he realize it?"

The actress added that Jacko "looked like a mannequin."

Perhaps sensing the extras' reluctance to insult him, but not the reason why, Jacko continued shouting, "No, you have to really insult me! Really do it! You have to make me mad! Make me really mad!"

 

 

Shortly after the shoot, the molestation allegations surfaced. Although the video was not connected to those allegations, and proves nothing, its theme was embarrassing enough that the actress was not surprised that the video was never released.

Is her story to be believed? It is noteworthy that the actress was not paid for her story. Furthermore, although she is not a household name, the Investigator has verified through the Internet Movie Database that she has performed in minor speaking roles, for film and TV. And finally, her description of the video is plausible. Jacko is known to be a horror film fan, having previously solicited John Landis to direct his werewolf themed Thriller video.

Copyright 2002 by HollywoodInvestigator.com

 

Check out this amazing Michael Jackson DVD Mega Box set -- filled with almost every video and interview Jacko ever gave!

On August 2, 2004, John S. e-mails: "Michael Jackson did release this video called Ghosts in 1997. It was shown for the first time at the Cannes film festival. Stan Winston was the director. The 42-minute flm was a great success and released on video and broadcast on VH-1 and MTV all over the world."

Related story: Jacko accused Sony of racism. Is he right? One music producer writing for the Hollywood Investigator says Yes!

Hank Willow is a Los Angeles based tabloid reporter who investigates Hollywood scams and Tinseltown's occult underbelly. Read about his adventures in tabloid journalism in Hollywood Witches.

 

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